Help make Canada a champion of an Arms Trade Treaty worthy of the name

Today, over 2,000 people will die from armed violence, be killed by drug traffickers, terrorists and sometimes by their own governments. Most of them will be poor people living in developing countries.

Such violence is a major obstacle to making poverty history. 

The causes of armed violence are many and varied, but there is one we can do something about: criminals’ easy access to guns.

There are more international regulations on the trade in bananas than the trade in lethal weapons. In fact, there are no global rules on selling and buying non-nuclear arms.
 
We are on the verge of a breakthrough on this tragedy. A treaty to stem the flow of weapons and ammunition to criminals and other human rights abusers will be negotiated at the United Nations during the month of July. 
 
The Arms Trade Treaty would bring all countries up to the high standards that Canada has to keep our arms exports from falling into the wrong hands.
 
A robust treaty would oblige all arms exporting governments to evaluate whether a weapons deal would be likely to lead to human rights violations, to worsen a humanitarian crisis or to undermine efforts to fight poverty. An effective treaty would oblige exporters to cancel those shipments that fail the test.
 
Canada has been a quiet supporter of such provisions to date. But we need Canada to be a vocal champion if we are to counter voices like those of Syria, Egypt and Iran, who would water the treaty down or tie it up in endless debate. 
 
Help make Canada a champion of an Arms Trade Treaty worthy of the name. Please write to Foreign Minister John Baird. Ask him to join with Mexico, the U.K., and those countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America that have suffered most from the plague of free-flowing weapons and are determined to rein it in. Ask him to speak out in favour of a robust and effective Arms Trade Treaty.
Your voice matters. Please write to Minister Baird today.
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